Alzheimer’s Disease – and the Dementia Myth

It appears that scientists may have been misled about the cause of Alzheimer’s disease.

In 2006, in an article published in a magazine called ‘Nature’, scientists claimed to have discovered a type of amyloid beta that brought on dementia in young rats.

(Like many doctors I am always suspicious of experiments performed on animals. They are often misleading as well as unethical.)

The paper in ‘Nature’ was widely quoted by scientists studying Alzheimer’s and a ton of money was raised to fund their work.

But now it appears that the authors of that article may have stuck together parts of photographs from different experiments.

It is feared that the original research may not have produced the desired results. And so the data might have been changed.

If this is true then much work on Alzheimer’s has been a waste of time. And, in my view, ‘Nature’ magazine will find its credibility badly damaged.

Many will be shocked by this but corrupt or fiddled research is commonplace in science.

In my 1977 book ‘Paper Doctors’ I revealed that a scientist called Dr William Summerlin at the Sloan Kettering Institute in New York did research which was highly praised by the American National Cancer Institute.

Summerlin was hired to work on the problems involved in transplanting skin.

His work was questioned, however, when he was found to have inked-in transplant sites with a black felt-tip pen on white mice supposed to have received transplants from black mice.

Corruption in science is all too common as scientists struggle to obtain the results they’re looking for.

Of course, the real problem with dementia is much bigger than a single, suspect piece of research. In my book Dementia Myth, I point out that the words ‘Alzheimer’s’ and ‘dementia’ are often thought to be the same thing. The result is chronic illness and huge profits for drug companies.

In Dementia Myth I explain why I believe that most cases of dementia are curable.

Dementia Myth is available as a paperback and an eBook.